Lessons From A Mosquito

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I’ve never pretended to have any great love affair with mosquitoes. Nasty, horrible, vile, blood-sucking fiends! However, I recently read an article that explained how some scientists are purposely trying to cause their extinction. That got me thinking…

Is it REALLY a good idea to eradicate an entire species on purpose? I mean… no matter how you think the earth got here or how long it took they have been here longer than we have.  Do we REALLY understand what role they play in our ecosystem?  How can we truly project the effect their extinction would have?

I truly believe that everything in our universe serves some purpose.  So what good could possibly come from these most annoying of pests?  Well… I can think of 3 important lessons we can learn from mosquitoes.

 Humans are NOT the masters of the universe.

We’re not even the top of the food chain.  Oh, sure. We’ve domesticated animals, harnessed the power of fire and decoded the genome but, when you get right down to it, we’re just mosquito food.

It’s not even some impressive, massively large, muscle-covered, highly intelligent beast that eats us. It’s a fragile, whining little tormentor.

Perhaps mosquitoes are here to keep us humble. Perhaps they are a reminder that we are a part of creation, designed to  have a role and live in harmony with our world.  We ought not be overly supercilious in our assumptions of our own grandeur.

The small things matter.

A famous African proverb tells us, “If you think you are too small to make a difference you haven’t spent the night with a mosquito.

You were equipped with every good gift you need to serve the vital role for which you and you alone were created. Mosquitoes are tiny and fragile. The world is vast and brutal. Yet mosquitoes have thrived here very nearly since the beginning of life, serving their role with great success.  Don’t ever let anyone make you feel unimportant!

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Results aren’t always immediately obvious.

Have you ever sat around a campfire, perfectly happy and content and comfortable and then had a lovely nights sleep and awoken in the morning to find that you are absolutely covered in miserably itchy bug bites?

Sometimes we undertake an action and the results are instantaneous. We know immediately if we’ve been successful. Other times the fruit of our effort takes a little (or a lot) longer to appear.

The mosquito reminds us that just because you don’t see success right away, doesn’t mean it isn’t on the way.  The mosquito doesn’t waste time worrying about whether or not she (I’ve heard only the females bite) did a good job of driving you half insane. She just lives her life to the best of her ability and trusts in her natural-born skill to leave you writhing in itchy agony.  (I’m pretty sure the whole hunger/instinct for survival thing is secondary to the instinct for inflicting misery when it comes to mosquitoes.)

Isn’t nature extraordinary? Isn’t it truly awe-inspiring that we can learn lessons from even the lowliest of creatures? Isn’t the complex design of the universe astonishing?  Even the most hated of creatures teaches us the most wonderful of lessons!

But, yeah. I’ll probably still swat at them, too.

Are you, too, seeking to save the earth, promote world peace and raise productive citizens without expending too much effort?

Why not follow LazyHippieMama on WordPress, by email or Facebook to get all the updates.

If we work on our goals together, they may be a little easier to achieve!  

This post is proudly linked to the “Showing Some Love Hump Day Blog Hop” at Home On Deranged. Go on over and see the LOVE for yourself!

Modern Hippie Momma
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10 responses »

  1. I feel like a mob boss in the way I think about mosquitoes (I want him dead!I want his whole family dead! I want to never remember his existence!) But of course now I have to change that way of thinking… thanks a lot! ( seriously, thank you!)

  2. I can’t bring myself to read this post. I am already having anxiety about heading down to the swampy, mosquito-filled park this evening to attend your festival. I am on the verge of a panic attack about it. On the verge of not even putting o OFF and see how it goes.

  3. There are some excellent points in this post. Who are we to decide what creatures “fit” into our society and what creatures do not? The mosquito is part of the food chain. Because they are so prolific, I would assume they are an important part of many creatures diet. How would WE feel if someone suddenly decided that potatoes would be totally obliterated from the planet? Just to think of a world with no mashed potatoes with our pot roast, no potato salad on a hot summer day or potato soup on a winter’s day. No more chips to go with our sandwiches. No more potatoes in beef stew and no more has browns for breakfast. We would create an uproar for certain. Eliminating the mosquito, as annoying as he might be, would make a big difference to all the bats, bird and frog who enjoy mosquitos.

  4. There are 3,500 named species of mosquito, of which only a couple of hundred bite or bother humans. They live on almost every continent and habitat, and serve important functions in numerous ecosystems. “Mosquitoes have been on Earth for more than 100 million years,” says Murphy, “and they have co-evolved with so many species along the way.” Wiping out a species of mosquito could leave a predator without prey, or a plant without a pollinator. And exploring a world without mosquitoes is more than an exercise in imagination: intense efforts are under way to develop methods that might rid the world of the most pernicious, disease-carrying species (see ‘War against the winged’ ).

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